Think that speeding up your website isn’t important?
Think again. A one-second delay in page load time yields:

11% fewer page views
16% decrease in customer satisfaction
7% loss in conversions
A few extra seconds could have a huge impact on your ability to engage visitors and make sales.
With that in mind, let’s get started.

1. Minimize HTTP requests
The first step to minimizing your requests is to figure out how many your site currently makes, to use as a benchmark. If you use Google Chrome, you can use the browser’s Developer Tools to see how many HTTP requests your site makes. Reducing this number of requests will speed up your site, look through your files and see if any are unnecessary.

2. Minify and combine files
Now that you know how many requests your site makes, you can get to work on reducing that number. The best place to get started is with your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files. These are extremely important files, as they determine your site’s appearance. They also add to the number of requests your site makes every time a user visits it. You can reduce this number by “minifying” and combining your files. This reduces the size of each file, as well as the total number of files. When it comes to your website, leaner is better. The fewer elements on a page, the fewer HTTP requests a browser will need to make the page render — and the faster it will load.

3. Use asynchronous loading for CSS and JavaScript files
Once you’ve minified and combined some of your files, you can also optimize the way that they load on your pages. Scripts like CSS and JavaScript can be loaded in two different ways: Synchronously or Asynchronously. If your scripts load synchronously, they load one at a time, in the order they appear on the page. If your scripts load asynchronously, on the other hand, some of them will load simultaneously.
Loading files asynchronously can speed up your pages because when a browser loads a page, it moves from top to bottom.

4. Defer JavaScript loading
Deferring a file means preventing it from loading until after other elements have loaded. If you defer larger files, like JavaScript, you ensure that the rest of your content can load without a delay. If you have a WordPress site, you can the WP Rocket plugin mentioned above to easily enable deferred JavaScript loading. Simply check the box next to “Load JS files deferred,” and you’re good to go.

5. Minimize time to first byte
In addition to the amount of time it takes for your page to fully load, you’ll also want to take a look at the amount of time it takes to start loading. Time to first byte, or TTFB, is the amount of time a browser has to wait before getting its first byte of data from the server. Google recommends a TTFB of less than 200 ms.

6. Reduce server response time
One of the biggest factors in how quickly your page loads is the amount of time your DNS lookup takes. A DNS, or domain name system, is a server with a database of IP addresses and their associated hostnames. When a user types a URL into their browser, a DNS server is what translates that URL into the IP address that indicates its location online. A DNS lookup, then, is the process of a finding a specific DNS record. You can think of it as your computer looking up a number in a phone book. The amount of time this step takes depends on how fast your DNS provider is. If not, it may be time to switch to a faster DNS provider.

7. Choose the right hosting option for your needs
Most new site owners choose the cheapest possible option for hosting. While this is often enough in the beginning, you’ll likely need to upgrade once you start getting more traffic.
When looking at hosting, you have three different options:

Shared hosting
VPS hosting
Dedicated server
Shared hosting is the cheapest option and you can often get it for about five dollars per month.

For more information about building the fastest websites, schedule a meeting with us and we will be happy to help.